New Chevrolet Volt Ads Attack Nissan Leaf, Toyota Prius

New Chevrolet Volt Ads Attack Nissan Leaf, Toyota Prius  
Compared to the 2016 Chevy Volt, a Nissan Leaf could leave you stranded, and it’s at least far from range-anxiety free. Similarly, the 2016 Toyota Prius uses 1990s tech in its NiMh battery.
These assertions are not ours, but, but the gist of new attack advertisements Chevrolet has in store to wake public up to the new 53-mile EV range, Volt. The ads are set to debut online this fall, and also on TV.
“We’re going to go head-to-head with Leaf and Prius,” said Chevrolet’s global chief marketing officer, Tim Mahoney in a report by Ad Age. “The ads allow Chevrolet to talk in one way and they allow Chevrolet’s personality to come through. We’re going to be taking more risks.”
This revelation was given to journalists in San Francisco as the automaker has begun shipping first units to California and 10 other states following California emissions rules, and where Mahoney says it has sold the best.
2016 will be a small model year, the rest if the U.S. will get a 2017 model year beginning next spring, but meanwhile the offensive is on.
The Volt, launched its first generation in 2011 and was nearly hidden in plain sight. The car came on te heels of a bankruptcy, bailout, restructuring, and the Volt was a poster child for Republican election hopefuls because Obama backed it.
Chevrolet caught lots of criticism for not marketing it effectively nationwide, and even seemed to tuck its tail between its legs, revealing in January 2014 it has stopped advertising Volt outside California and tech fairs where public could comprehend its value.
Despite that, the Volt was, when objectively examined, really disruptive and now ads themselves will be disruptive for generation two in a mildly confrontational sort of way.
This psychology will include a scene with Leaf drivers stuck between floors in an elevator, an unnerving encounter, to get the point crosswise of an EV being stuck. Getting caught out of juice in a world oriented toward gasoline is no fun – especially when recharging takes a while for the Leaf unless you run out coincidentally at one of the few level 3 quick chargers out there.
What was not reported is the new 2016 Leaf will offer as much as 106 miles range – no doubt to counter the upgraded Volt as Leaf sales have start to fade compared to last year.
And the new Prius will son be shown in a higher-efficienct “eco” version which may have li-ion battery pioneered since 2012 in the plug-in Prius – and it will have superior fuel economy.
But the extended-range electric Volt is unique with skill to run on electricity then seamlessly switch to its 1.5-liter gas engine for hybrid mode.
Those who get it, well, they get it. But Chevrolet is trying to get past a public with apparent Volt blindness to see whether it can beat analysts predictions on tepid sales.
Mahoney said the attack ad thought is part of a “shattering perceptions” strategy that has increased brand perception by 3 percent.
The base Volt starts at $33,995, in this area $1,115 less than last year while delivering significantly longer EV range, and better mileage in gas operation at 42 mpg.
Ad Age

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Top Apps Distracted Teen Driver Use Behind The Wheel

Top Apps Distracted Teen Driver Use Behind The Wheel More than one in three teens admit to taking their eyes off the road when app notifications come in while pouring.
A recent study reveals alarming statistics involving distracted pouring among teenagers, with an overwhelming 88 percent of teens who consider themselves “safe” drivers admitting to using phone apps on the road.
So just which social media apps are so vital that teenagers found it de rigueur to check their smartphones while pouring? The most well loved app that teens report using while behind the wheel is Snapchat at 38 percent. Of those surveyed, 20 percent said Instagram, while 17 percent pointed to Twitter. Both Facebook and YouTube had 12 percent of the votes, which also means that teenage drivers are catching up on watching videos while behind the wheel.
SEE ALSO: Distracted Pouring: A Hot Button Issue
The survey was conducted by Liberty Mutual Insurance and Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) and involved 1,622 11th and 12th graders crosswise the country. In addition to social media apps distracting teen drivers, 37 percent of the teens surveyed admitted to texting to confirm or co-ordinate event details while pouring.
“Today’s hyper-connected teens’ ‘dread of missing out’ can place young drivers at risk on the road, as they may be more plugged into their devices than the actual pouring task,” said Dr. William Horrey, Ph.D., principal research scientist at the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety.
“Teens may be at higher risk because they don’t always have the attentional room to deal with all the complexities on the road. These distractions in addition to fatigue may be even more significant with teens due to their relative pouring inexperience as well. It’s so vital for parents and teens to recognize and talk in this area these perilous distractions to ensure better safety behind the wheel.”
This article originally appeared at Rawvehicle.com

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Average Age For Cars in US Increases To 11.5 Years

Average Age For Cars in US Increases To 11.5 Years The average vehicle on U.S. roads is roughly 11.5 years ancient.
That means that the average car pouring beside you was bought groundbreaking new in 2004 (like the 2004 Town, seen above). According to IHS Automotive, overall vehicle registrations have grown by 2 percent compared to last year, and now sit at a record 257.9 million cars and trucks on U.S. roads.
Since IHS started tracking vehicle age in 2002, the average age has consistently gone up thanks to the ever better reliability of new vehicles. On average, new car buyers hold onto their cars for 6.5 years, while buyers of used vehicles tend to hold onto their cars for five years.
The report also shows that the roads are no longer dominated by ancient trucks, as the average age of cars has now caught up and sits on par with pickups.
Climbing new car sales will likely slow down the aging of our automotive fleet, which IHS predicts will hit an average of 11.7 years ancient by 2018.

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Average New Car Window Sticker 25.4 mpg in June

Average New Car Window Sticker 25.4 mpg in June The average fuel economy of new cars sold has increased over the years but not without insignificant setbacks, and June’s average window sticker was one of them, declining 0.1 mpg to 25.4 mpg.
This tick backwards was documented by researchers Michael Sivak, Ph.D. and Brandon Schoettle of the Sustainable Worldwide Transportation University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.
Since UMTRI has been tracking average window sticker values in October 2007, EPA-rated fuel economy has increased for new cars sold by 5.3 mpg.
The researchers speculate increased sales of light trucks and SUVs in June are accountable for the mpg decline.
According to the UMTRI’s Eco-Pouring Index which estimates average monthly greenhouse gas emissions by an individual U.S. driver, this measure was up from 0.82 in Development to 0.85 in April.
The lower the value the better here, so GHG is up a bit as well. Since October 2007, emissions in April were lower by 15 percent but 9 percet higher than in August 2014 which was a record month for these measures.

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Nissan Cancels Pathfinder Hybrid and Infiniti QX60 Hybrid

Nissan Cancels Pathfinder Hybrid and Infiniti QX60 Hybrid Nissan has axed two of its hybrid SUV models.
The 2016 Nissan Pathfinder and Infiniti QX60 models won’t have hybrid variants, disappearing after just one year on the market. Nissan confirmed the news on its website with a splash image saying that the “Pathfinder Hybrid is no longer available” pointing customers to the regular gasoline Pathfinder and the Leaf for those looking for ultra-efficiency. The hybrid models were powered by a 2.5-liter four-cylinder paired to a 20-hp electric motor and in adjoin-wheel drive form, returned an EPA-estimated 26-mpg combined, marking just a 3-mpg improvement over the non-hybrid model. All-wheel drive hybrid models also got 26-mpg combined, besting the standard one by 4 mpg.
There’s a chance that Nissan plans on filling the void, albeit indirectly, with a Rogue hybrid offering, which is now sold in Europe under the X-Trail nameplate. The company is also working on its next-generation battery technology with its Leaf, claiming that a 250-mile range isn’t out of reach. With improvements to its EVs, Nissan could be waiting on a better hybrid system that would give its SUV models more of an advantage compared to their gasoline counterparts when it comes to fuel economy.
This article originally appeared at Rawvehicle.com

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Top Five Highest Driver-Estimated-MPG Cars

Top Five Highest Driver-Estimated-MPG Cars They say they don’t make them like they used to, and maybe that is right, as drivers have voted up older vehicles as the most fuel efficient.
The the EPA’s “My MPG” program is open to current models, one car is a present-generation model, but these scores based on this week’s tally (updated weekly) are mainly older models. Nor is this a fluke, as these cars have tended to reside high up even if they do budge places from time to time.
The federal agency’s scoring is on a bit of an honor system, but these are averaged numbers by drivers registered with the EPA who say they’ve calculated their mpg. The EPA provides guidance on the procedure.
Perhaps it’s not a surprise these cars are ranked as they are. There are fan clubs for some of them, so it very well could be public are hanging onto them, carefully keeping them going, and reporting efficiency as a point of pride.
Not included in this tally are plug-in hybrids and electric cars as those score even higher by EPA reckoning. The list is open to regular hybrids and internal combustion models, with fuel sipper varieties scoring highest.
Also not included is even one car newer than a 2014 model year, so go figure. Or rather, maybe the public who care have gone and figured for you.
Following are the cars, their reported mpg, and combined official EPA mpg, as well as number of drivers for each car which tallied these averaged mpg scores.
5. 1999 Chevrolet Metro – 48.8 mpg (50 EPA) Read more

2016 Prius Spied Testing In Thailand

2016 Prius Spied Testing In Thailand Only last week what was said to be a 2016 Toyota Prius was seen in California, and now one has been spied testing in Thailand.
The next-generation Toyota Prius was previously expected to debut by now, but the Japanese automaker pushed its unveiling in peacefulness to revamp its styling. The 2016 Toyota Prius spied here closely resembles the current model with just a lot of black tape, hinting that Toyota won’t drastically change its styling for the next iteration, although we can’t see the adjoin end. The larger changes to the 2016 Toyota Prius will be its platform with the new model riding on the Toyota New Global Architecture that will help the well loved hybrid shed 20 percent of its weight.
SEE ALSO: 2016 Toyota Prius Spied?
Reports say that the 2016 Toyota Prius will have a thermal efficiency of 40 percent, compared to the current model’s 38.5 percent. The previous generation Toyota Prius had a thermal efficiency of 37 percent. If the next-generation Prius turns out to be rated at 40 percent, it could possibly have the highest thermal efficiency rating out of all mass-produced passenger vehicles. It is also expected that the 2016 Toyota Prius will be available with either nickel-metal hydride or lithium-ion batteries, with the latter being more expensive but offering a better all-electric pouring range.
The 2016 Toyota Prius will make its debut later this year and the plug-in hybrid model will follow in mid-2016.

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How Do Electric Vehicle Incentives Compare To Oil And Gas Subsidies?

How Do Electric Vehicle Incentives Compare To Oil And Gas Subsidies? More regions have recently reduced government-financed incentive programs for electric vehicles to save money, but many of these same areas are already paying far more to support the oil and gas diligence.
As much as $5.3 trillion is washed-out annually worldwide to subsidize fossil fuels, according to a new report from the International Fiscal Fund. Renewable energy subsidies, in comparison, total only $120 billion each year.
Norway was one of the most recent countries to reduce tax benefits, while at the same time announcing earlier this month that electric vehicle (EV) owners will start paying road use fees in 2018. Legislators in Georgia also finished a $5,000 EV tax incentive last month, replacing the credit with an annual road use fee.
Though the term “electric vehicle” is typically used in connection with these incentives, many subsidies also extended to low emission vehicles, such as hybrids, and other types of zero emission vehicles, including fuel cell cars.
Point-of-sale rebates and tax credits make up some of the more generous EV incentives, but programs such as free parking or access to carpool lanes were also existing to stimulate sales of low emission vehicles.
SEE ALSO: Illinois Halts Its Plug-In Vehicle Discount Program
Many of these reductions for EV incentives are being implemented in the name of financial statement shortfalls. In some regions, allocations to build and maintain roads have been especially compromised.
And while austerity measures often lead to a reduction in spending crosswise categories, a recent report noted that similar cuts aren’t posting under the oil and gas diligence’s discourse.
“Fossil fuel companies are benefitting from global subsidies of $5.3 [trillion] a year, equivalent to $10 [million] a minute each day,” reported The Guardian, which sourced a recent study by the International Fiscal Fund.
“The IMF calls the revelation ‘shocking’ and says the figure is an ‘extremely robust’ estimate of the right cost of fossil fuels.”
SEE ALSO: Congress-Commissioned Study Recommends PEV Tax Credit Become Point Of Sale Discount
Much of this money, said The Guardian, pays for problems arising from pollution associated with burning oil, gas and coal.
“This very vital analysis shatters the myth that fossil fuels are cheap by screening just how huge their real costs are,” said Nicholas Stern, professor and chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
“There is no justification for these enormous subsidies for fossil fuels, which distort markets and hurts economies, particularly in poorer countries.”
By cutting oil and gas subsidies instead of EV incentives, the IMF said that 1.6 million lives a year worldwide would be saved due to improved air quality.
“Ending subsidies for fossil fuels would cut global carbon emissions by 20 percent,” said The Guardian.
“The need for subsidies for renewable energy – a relatively tiny $120 billion a year – would also disappear, if fossil fuel prices reflected the full cost of their impacts.”
While supporters of low and zero emission vehicles agree that more incentives will help the technology become more accepted and widespread, a consensus on how to start these has not been reached. Some prefer a tax credit, redeemable against taxes owed when filing personal taxes each year. Others say a point-of-sale discount, which instantly lowers the vehicle price and is applicable to any consumer, is the better route.
But making a case to increase spending on EV programs is proving hard for some regions.
“Governments may reckon they can’t afford to shell out cash for this purpose but, as the IMF study showed in grisly detail, there are much worse ways to waste state money,” said The Cheat Sheet. “Gas is just not as cheap as you reckon.”

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